Snyder Gets Credit for Michigan’s Economic Comeback, U.S. Senate Race Match Ups, Schuette Leads Whitmer in Attorney General Race, Johnson Leads Benson in Secretary of State Rematch, Undecideds Prevail in Supreme Court Contest

Lansing According to a recent statewide survey conducted by Marketing Resource Group (MRG) and Inside Michigan Politics (IMP), Michigan voters credit Governor Rick Snyder for Michigan’s economic turnaround, slightly prefer Gary Peters in the US Senate Race, give Bill Schuette their support for Attorney General, side with Ruth Johnson in her reelection for Secretary of State, and in the Michigan Supreme Court contest – the undecideds hold the lead.

Michigan voters credit Governor Snyder over President Barack Obama for Michigan’s economic comeback by six percent. When asked if Governor Snyder’s or President Obama’s policies were responsible for Michigan’s economic turnaround, 42 percent of Michigan voters credited Governor Snyder while 36 percent said President Obama.

“While Governor Snyder’s policies have often been controversial, a plurality of Michigan voters credit him with the state’s economic recovery. These numbers bode well for Governor Snyder’s reelection next year,” said Tom Shields, President of MRG.

These numbers show a shift towards giving Governor Snyder credit for Michigan’s turn around. Last March, the MRG Michigan Poll showed 40 percent giving President Obama credit and only 35 percent named Governor Snyder. The question wording and results are listed below.

Some economic experts have said that the Michigan economy is showing signs of a comeback. Whose policies do you believe are mostly responsible for Michigan’s economic turnaround, (ROTATE: Governor Rick Snyder’s or President Barack Obama’s?)

Governor Snyder: 42%
President Obama: 36%
Both (Volunteered): 5%
Neither / Other (Volunteered): 10%
It is not getting better (Volunteered): 3%
Don’t Know (Volunteered): 4%
Refused (Volunteered): *

U.S. Senate
In the general election race for the United States Senate seat, voters show support for Congressman Gary Peters with varied results in match ups with Congressmen Mike Rogers and Justin Amash. In the Peters-Rogers contest, Peters’ received 37 percent of voter support compared to Rogers’ 34 percent, giving Peters a slight three percent edge with 29 percent undecided. In the Peters-Amash race, Peters’ received 39 percent compared to Amash’s 31 percent with 31 percent undecided, giving Peters an eight percent lead.

Congressman Mike Rogers carries out state Michigan, while Congressman Gary Peters narrowly wins in the Flint-Saginaw area by four percent, and carries the Detroit Metro area by 14 percent.  Congressman Justin Amash carries West Michigan and the Upper Lower Peninsula, while Congressman Gary Peters carries the remainder of the state. In the Detroit Metro area Peters leads Amash by 17 percent.

“The Congressional field is plentiful and promising for the prospective candidates. Today, Amash and Peters draw the majority of their support from the party faithful and their Congressional districts,” said Bill Ballenger, Editor and Publisher of Inside Michigan Politics. “Rogers enjoys substantial support statewide and competes effectively with Peters in the vote rich Detroit Metro Area. The 2014 U.S. Senate race is likely to be the most contested Michigan has seen since 2000.”

The question wording and results are listed below.

And if the US Senate Candidates were (ROTATE: Mike Rogers the Republican and Gary Peters the Democrat), for whom would you vote? (IF UNDECIDED OR REFUSED, ASK: Which way do you lean as of today, toward Rogers or Peters?)

Vote Rogers: 27%
Lean Rogers: 7%
Vote Peters: 30%
Lean Peters: 7%
Don’t know / Undecided: 29%
Refused: *

TOTAL ROGERS: 34%
TOTAL PETERS: 37%

If the general election for US Senator from Michigan were being held today, and the candidates were (ROTATE: Justin Amash the Republican and Gary Peters the Democrat), for whom would you vote? (IF UNDECIDED OR REFUSED, ASK: Which way to you lean as of today, toward Amash or Peters?)

Vote Amash: 23%
Lean Amash: 8%
Vote Peters: 32%
Lean Peters: 7%
Don’t know / Undecided: 30%
Refused: *

TOTAL AMASH: 31%
TOTAL PETERS: 39%

Attorney General
In the race for Attorney General, 40 percent of Michigan voters support Attorney General Bill Schuette, while 36 percent support Gretchen Whitmer with 23 percent undecided. Schuette wins out state Michigan by significant margins, while losing only mid-Michigan by two percent and the Detroit Metro area by six percent. With 51 percent of the undecided voters in the Metro Detroit area, both candidates will spend their time wooing voters in Southeast Michigan.

“Attorney General Schuette is well positioned for a challenge from Senator Whitmer. His strength in her Senate District and in the Detroit Metro area is a plus for Schuette,” said Shields. “Whitmer’s position as Senate Minority leader has helped her build statewide support. If Whitmer can solidify her base, win Detroit Metro’s undecided votes and take votes from Schuette out state, this could be a close race.”

The question wording and results are listed below.

If the general election for Michigan Attorney General were being held today, and the candidates were (ROTATE: Bill Schuette (SHOO-tee) the Republican and Gretchen Whitmer the Democrat), for whom would you vote? (IF UNDECIDED OR REFUSED, ASK: Which way to you lean as of today, toward Schuette or Whitmer?)

Vote Schuette: 35%
Lean Schuette: 6%
Vote Whitmer: 30%
Lean Whitmer: 6%
Don’t know / Undecided: 23%
Refused: *

TOTAL SCHUETTE: 40%
TOTAL WHITMER: 36%

Secretary of State
In what is likely to be a rematch between Secretary of State Ruth Johnson and Wayne State professor Jocelyn Benson, Michigan voters preferred Ruth Johnson 38 percent to 33 percent with 29 percent undecided. Johnson carries out state Michigan, ties in mid-Michigan and trails in the Detroit Metro area by only four percent.

“While Johnson enjoys a seven point lead today, the sizeable number of undecided voters makes this a fluid race,” said Ballenger. “With high numbers of undecided voters in the race, both Johnson and Benson have a shot at securing these votes. This is going to be a close race in the fall of 2014.”

The question wording and results are listed below.

And for Michigan Secretary of State … if the candidates were (ROTATE: Ruth Johnson the Republican and Jocelyn (JAHSS-eh-lin) Benson the Democrat), for whom would you vote? (IF UNDECIDED OR REFUSED, ASK: Which way do you lean as of today, toward Johnson of Benson?)

Vote Johnson: 33%
Lean Johnson: 5%
Vote Benson: 28%
Lean Benson: 5%
Don’t know / Undecided: 29%
Refused: *

TOTAL JOHNSON: 38%
TOTAL BENSON: 33%

Supreme Court
In a probable Supreme Court Justice race between Connie Marie Kelley and newly appointed Justice David Viviano, Michigan voters support Kelley 24 percent to Viviano’s 14 percent, with a whopping 61 percent undecided.

“Today, undecided voters hold the lead in the 2014 Michigan Supreme Court race. Michigan voters have not yet checked into this race,” said Ballenger. “Kelley’s recent Supreme Court campaign continues to deliver a ballot boost over Viviano, who is his first month as a Michigan Supreme Court Justice.”

The question wording and results are listed below.

And for Michigan Supreme Court Justice … if the candidates were (ROTATE: Justice David Viviano and Connie Marie Kelley), for whom would you vote? (IF UNDECIDED OR REFUSED, ASK: Which way do you lean as of today, toward Viviano or Kelley?)

Vote Viviano: 12%
Lean Viviano: 2%
Vote Kelley: 21%
Lean Kelley: 3%
Don’t know / Undecided: 61%
Refused: 1%

TOTAL VIVIANO: 14%
TOTAL KELLEY: 24%

Marketing Resource Group’s Spring 2013 MRG Michigan Poll was conducted March 17 through March 23. The poll was conducted by live professionally trained telephone interviewers. The random sample, consisting of 600 likely voters who indicated that they will be voting in the November general election, has a margin of error of ±4 percentage points or less within a 95 percent degree of confidence.

The cluster sample was drawn from a list of voters likely to vote in the November general elections, which is determined by their participation in previous statewide general elections. The individuals included in that list and their voting histories are updated monthly. The poll sample is stratified by statewide voter turnout and is geographically representative of general election voter turnout in Michigan. 20 percent of the respondents are likely voters who live in cell phone-only households. Those respondents were manually dialed, contacted and interviewed on their cell-phones and they indicated that they do not have a land line telephone in their homes.

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