MI_Poll_LogoOver half of Michigan voters cannot name either of their U.S. Senators

LANSING, Mich. – Just eleven percent of voters in Michigan can name both of the State’s U.S. Senators and 61 percent cannot name either one according to a recent poll testing voter knowledge of some of our national and state elected officials. The ability to name federal officials is part of the U.S citizenship test.

Among Michigan’s U.S. Senators, Senator Debbie Stabenow is better known (36 percent) than first term Senator Gary Peters (15 percent). Surprisingly, only 30 percent of women could name Stabenow as compared to 44 percent of the men.

The results were part of a poll conducted by Marketing Resource Group (MRG) conducted in April 2015.

Do you know Joe?

Voters find it a little easier to recall the name of the Vice President of the United States; when asked, 69 percent were able to call to mind the name Joe Biden. Two percent offered a name other than Joe Biden, and 29 percent said they did not know. As with Stabenow, Joe Biden has a name recall gender gap of -14 percent among women.

Of the names tested, voters had the easiest time naming Rick Snyder as the Governor (84 percent). The poll did not test out President Obama. Hopefully, we didn’t need to.

“It looks like Michigan voters need a civics class refresher,” says Tom Shields, President of MRG. “According to our survey, almost a third of all likely voters – those who decide our elections – would have a difficult time passing an impromptu citizenship test.”

The citizenship test has 100 possible questions including the two tested here. Prospective citizens are orally tested, and must correctly answer six of ten randomly selected, open-ended questions.

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MRG Michigan Poll Spring 2015
The survey of 600 likely Michigan voters was conducted by live interview April 13-17, 2015. The sample was randomly drawn from a listed sample of all registered voters with a history of voting and stratified by city and township to reflect voter turnout. In addition, quotas for gender and cell phone interviews were met within each geographic area, and extra efforts were made to reach African Americans. Thirty percent of the interviews were conducted with cell phone only or cell phone dominate households.

A sample of 600 likely voters in Michigan yields a sampling margin of error of ±4 percent with a 95 percent confidence interval. The sampling margin of error for subgroups may be higher depending on the size of the subgroup.

About Marketing Resource Group, Inc.
Lansing, Michigan-based Marketing Resource Group, Inc. (www.mrgmi.com) is an award-winning PR firm representing corporate, association, nonprofit, and private clients with interests in Michigan. MRG offers expertise in public affairs, communications, political campaign management, and public opinion survey research. For more than thirty years, MRG has conducted its bi-annual omnibus Michigan Poll™, tracking the pulse of Michigan voters on key statewide public policy and political issues. MRG is the only Michigan public opinion survey research firm that maintains nearly 30 years of trend analyses of voter attitudes related to state and national leaders, political parties, and the political and economic climate in Michigan.

Follow MRG on Twitter @mrgmichigan and on Facebook.

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