* Snyder Job approval turns slightly positive
* Snyder personal ratings are improving
* Voters think state is on the right track
* And the economy will continue to improve
* But is still the number one issue

LANSING, Mich. – Recent statewide polling shows the voters are in a more positive and optimistic mood and that appears to be having a positive effect on their attitudes toward Governor Snyder. For the first time since the Flint water crises, more voters in the state believe the Governor is doing a good job than those who believe he’s doing a poor job. According to a recent MRG statewide survey, the Governor’s Job approval rating stands at 42 percent approve and 40 percent disapprove.

The Governor received positive approval ratings from voters in Oakland County, west Michigan, northern Michigan and the Upper Peninsula. He received overall negative approval ratings from voters in Wayne County (especially Detroit) and Macomb County, mid-Michigan and the Flint/Saginaw/Bay City area.

The Governor’s personal approval ratings have also improved as more voters now have a positive view of him than a negative view (38 percent positive vs. 37 percent negative). Just 18 months ago, only 34 percent of voters viewed the Governor positively while 51 percent had a negative perception of Governor Snyder.

“Michigan voters may be putting Flint in the rearview mirror as they are feeling better about the Governor and the direction of the state,” said Tom Shields, President of MRG. “Positive change of pubic opinion moves like a tortoise, but people believe things are now headed in the right direction and the economy will continue to improve.”

The poll also showed that almost half (48 percent) of the voters believe that Michigan is now on the right and only 35 percent believe the state is on the wrong track. This attitude is a significant change as only 30 percent of the voters thought the state was on the right track 18 months ago.

The voters are also optimistic for the future as 40 percent believe the economy will improve in the next year as compared to only 9 percent thought is was going to get worse.

The economy is still the number one issue voters are concerned with, as 33 percent said it was the most important issue in Michigan. But that is a significant change from polls 5-6 years ago, when 90 percent of the voters were naming it as the number one issue. The economy was followed by education named by 21 percent of the voters and roads and infrastructure cited by 16 percent of the voters. No other issue broke double digits.

The Questions and Results
The results and the wording of the questions asked by MRG follow. Also below are trend charts showing both the Governor’s personal and job approval ratings, the State right direction/wrong track numbers and how voters feel about the economy since Governor Snyder took office in January of 2011.

Q. In general, do you approve or disapprove of the job Governor Snyder is doing as governor? [IF APPROVE / DISAPPROVE, ASK:] Would that be strongly (approve / disapprove) or just somewhat (approve / disapprove)?

Strongly approve……………………..12.5%
Somewhat approve…………………..29.8%
Neither approve / disapprove…….12.8%
Somewhat disapprove………………17.0%
Strongly disapprove…………………23.7%
Don’t know……………………………….4.2%
Refused…………………………………..-

TOTAL APPROVE………………..42.3%
TOTAL DISAPPROVE…………..40.7%

 

Q. Is your general impression of Rick Snyder very positive, somewhat positive, somewhat negative, or very negative?

Very Positive………………………….10.7%
Somewhat Positive …………………26.8%
Neutral…………………………………..23.2%
Somewhat Negative…………………16.0%
Very Negative ………………………..21.0%
Do not know…………………………….1.8%

Q. Do you feel things in this state are generally going in the right direction, or do you feel things have gotten pretty seriously off on the wrong track?

Right direction……………………..48.0%
Wrong track…………………………35.2%
Don’t know………………………….16.0%
Refused………………………………..0.8%

Q. Over the next year, do you think the economy in Michigan will get better, get worse, or stay about the same?

Better………………………………..40.0%
Worse…………………………………9.3%
Stay the same……………………42.0%
Don’t know………………………..8.5%
Refused…………………………….0.2%

Q. What is the most important issue facing Michigan …

Economy/Jobs/wages ………………….33%
Education Quality/Funding ………….21%
Roads/bridges/Infrastructure………..16%
Health Insurance/Access ………………9%
Flint Water Crises/Drinking water….7%
Taxes …………………………………………7%
Great Lakes/Environment……………..6%
Auto Insurance Rates……………………4%
Don’t Know………………………………..7%
Nothing………………………………………5%

* totals are greater than 100% because respondents were given a chance to name two issues

MRG Michigan Poll® Fall 2017
The survey of 600 likely Michigan voters was conducted by live interview September 13-18,
2017. The sample was randomly drawn from a listed sample of all registered voters with a
history of voting and stratified by city and township to reflect voter turnout. 30% of the sample
was conducted with cell phone users. In addition, quotas for gender and cell phone interviews
were met within each geographic area, and extra efforts were made to reach African Americans.Thirty percent of the interviews were conducted with cell phone only or cell phone dominant households.

A sample of 600 likely voters in Michigan yields a sampling margin of error of ±4 percent with a 95 percent confidence interval. The sampling margin of error for subgroups may be higher depending on the size of the subgroup.

About Marketing Resource Group, Inc.
Lansing, Michigan-based Marketing Resource Group, Inc. (www.mrgmi.com) is an award-winning PR firm representing corporate, association, nonprofit, and private clients with interests in Michigan. MRG offers expertise in public affairs, communications, political campaign management, and public opinion survey research. For more than thirty years, MRG has conducted its bi-annual omnibus Michigan Poll™, tracking the pulse of Michigan voters on key statewide public policy and political issues. MRG is the only Michigan public opinion survey research firm that maintains nearly 30 years of trend analyses of voter attitudes related to state and national leaders, political parties, and the political and economic climate in Michigan.

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