Support for the Boards resignation is across the board

LANSING, Mich. – In a recent statewide poll of voters, Forty-nine percent of likely Michigan voters say the Michigan State University Board of Directors should resign as a result of the way they handled the Larry Nassar sexual abuse scandal. Only twenty-nine percent thought the Board should stay and make things right.

“Support for the Board member’s resignations came from all geographical, political and demographic groups across the state,” said Tom Shields, President of MRG. “There is a clear lack of confidence in the Board.”

The strongest support comes from self-identified Democrats (53 percent resign, 25 percent stay) and voters who live in the Lansing media market (62 percent resign, 19 percent stay). Women and men were equal in calling for the Boards resignation.

Party Identification

 

Geographic Location

The actual wording of the question is listed below:

Do you think the Michigan State University Board of Trustees should resign for how they handled the Dr. Larry Nassar sexual abuse scandal, or should they stay and make things right?

Resign………………………………………………………………………… 49%

Stay and make this right……………………………………………….. 27%

No opinion (YOL)……………………………………………………….. 14%

Undecided/DK…………………………………………………………….. 10%

Refused………………………………………………………………………. 0%

 

MRG Michigan Poll Spring 2018

The survey of 600 likely Michigan voters was conducted by live interview March 13-17, 2018. The sample was randomly drawn from a listed sample of all registered voters with a history of voting and stratified by city and township to reflect voter turnout. 30% of the sample was conducted with cell phone users. In addition, quotas for gender and cell phone interviews were met within each geographic area, and extra efforts were made to reach African Americans. Thirty percent of the interviews were conducted with cell phone only or cell phone dominant households. This question on marijuana was a part of the 2018 Spring Michigan Poll and was not commissioned by any outside 3rd party groups.

A sample of 600 likely voters in Michigan yields a sampling margin of error of ±4 percent with a 95 percent confidence interval.

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